LMNEditor

Oct 012013
 

I am sorry Terrabeat fans – am at a loss of what to say. This has been the first month where nothing has come to me. It is a goodbye and goodbyes are hard to say – even though we will be online – it is still the end of an era. There will be no more sitting down at coffeeshops perusing through the Louisville Music News – and no words are coming out. I have spent all night and all morning trying to find the words and nothing is coming.

This man has allowed me to be part of the Louisville music scene and am hopefully starting a career in booking, managing, etc. Virtually every opportunity I have ever had in Louisville – I owe to Louisville Music News whether it was co-organizing the Sudanese Rebaba Mayor Show last November or being asked to recruit musicians for Ambassador Shabazz for the International Day of Peace this September. I am a person who has always been musical but have no background as musicians – and Paul was kind enough to help me find a desperately desired musical outlet and place in this City.

Louisville Music News has not only allowed me to obtain opportunities I would not have had in Louisville, but also outside of Louisville as well. I am managing an ancient lyre musician living in Wales whom I started a correspondence with several years ago because of researching for a column for LMN – and am also working on two tour research for two groups – Indialcua – a kathak/flamenco group based in Europe – and Kitka – a vocal group based in San Francisco. I owe everything to Louisville Music News – and this has been the most difficult thing I ever had to write because nothing is coming out. Even though we will be online – there is a sense of change – and it is very, very, very difficult to put on paper.

Louisville Music News is that rare thing: a music paper that covers more of the music scene than just one genre – and people will miss LMN and what it has done for the City.

Aug 112013
 
Habib Koité

The Clifton Center has just announced that African guitarist Habib Koité will perform on March 2, 2014. Koité is a native of Mali, a country noted for the musicality of its population and which was recently taken over by Islamic militants, who banned public singing and regularly smashed musicians’ instruments. The militants were subsequently ousted by a French force. Koité has a new album, Brothers in Bamako, to add to his list. Tickets are on sale and run $19 through $24